By Ramah Kudaimi, Deputy Campaign Director - Crescendo

A woman in a headwrap and woman wearing hijab hold protest signs reading slogals from the Repeal the Ban rally.
A woman in a headwrap and woman wearing hijab hold protest signs reading slogals from the Repeal the Ban rally.
Protest image from NoMuslimBanEver.com

Once it became apparent that Joe Biden won the 2020 Presidential election, many communities breathed a collective sigh of relief. For Muslim Americans in particular, it was momentous. After all, Donald Trump spent his presidency banning our families, scapegoating all Muslims, and filling the government with officials who made no attempt to hide their disdain for our faith.

President Biden ran on the promise of undoing much of what Trump had wrought and a return to normalcy. That included a promise to repeal the Muslim Ban, a series of executive orders that restricted immigration from several Muslim-majority countries. …


The white supremacist attack on the Capitol on January 6 has shed light on many familiar problems around how such violence is covered by the media and reacted to by policy makers and even our own communities.

Discussions have taken place about how to talk about this attack, the use of the terrorism framework and what that means in prolonging the almost 20 year old Global War on Terror, and why even when an act of violence is clearly rooted in U.S. right-wing, white supremacist movements, some still rely on anti-Muslim metaphors to describe and respond to it.

Image for post
Image for post

By Nahid Soltanzadeh, MPower Change, Ramah Kudaimi, ACRE, and Munira Lokhandwala, LittleSis

Stop Calling It Terrorism

Plenty has been written- see links at the end- about why we must resist the urge to label this episode of white supremacist violence “terrorism” and that our goal should be to end the War on Terror, not expand it to include white people.

The problem is not that the state or even the public don’t know that “terrorist” applies to white people. Black activists have been reminding us that the very settling and founding of the US is the result of white terror. …


By Tia Oso — Director of Communications, ACRE

Image for post
Image for post
Image Description: Graphic depicting a map in the shape of the contiguous 48 states of the United States, superimposed with the logos of Amazon, Google, Blackstone and Fidelity and an image of a KKK member with the letters MAGA emblazoned on their chest in red.

We all watched in horror last week as a group of armed insurrectionists stormed the United States Capitol and attempted a coup in support of Donald Trump. As the story unfolds, it is becoming clear that many in the mob were prepared to kidnap and even execute members of Congress and the Vice President, in a harrowing attempt to overturn the results of the 2020 Presidential Election. This deadly insurrectionist violence was incited by Donald Trump, numerous members of Congress, and networks of white supremacist and far-right organizations who spread misinformation and conspiracy theories about the election, stoked racial division, and even encouraged violence. …


by Maurice BP-Weeks, Co-Executive Director at ACRE

Image for post
Image for post

During the primaries for the 2020 election my organization “anti endorsed” Pete Buttigieg. To us, Pete represents many of the things that are wrong with the Democratic Party. He is able to mask corporate values in the scent of progressivism — smiling in your face while declining to support actual progressive policy. Pete is not a progressive by any definition of the word. In that initial anti-endorsement statement we documented the things that Pete believes in, and what his true values are. …


by ACRE

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Tiffany Tertipes on Unsplash

As we fight for our collective freedom and liberation, elections are an important step in the broader process of making change. When they’re conducted freely and fairly, elections are meant to give the people a voice in shaping the world we live in by offering us the opportunity to elect leaders who represent our values. American democracy has always been fraught and our elections have never truly been fair or free. Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) and women were functionally excluded from the democratic process for the overwhelming majority of the history of the United States, and have been pushed to the margins of the system for the remainder of it. …


Both have built their legacies around hatred toward specific racial and religious minorities and have worked tirelessly to villainize, jail, and incite violence against them.

by Jessica Quiason, ACRE Senior Research Analyst, Ramah Kudaimi, ACRE Deputy Campaign Director & Munira Lokhandwala, Little Sis Community Manager

Image for post
Image for post
Photo from The Economic Times

On September 29, Amnesty International announced it was halting its work in India following a crackdown by the government, including a complete freezing of its bank accounts. This is just the latest example of repression of human rights defenders and activists by the Indian government, led by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, and mirrors similar attacks in the US by the administration of President Trump. While the right wing in India has consolidated its power and unleashed attacks against vulnerable communities, including Muslims, Modi has enjoyed political support from both sides of the aisle in the US. But even a superficial look into his administration would render any progressive speechless, and what becomes clear is that Modi and Trump are two peas in a bigoted pod. Both have built their legacies around hatred toward specific racial and religious minorities and have worked tirelessly to villainize, jail, and incite violence against them. …


by Saqib Bhatti, Co-Executive Director of ACRE and Reema Ahmad, Organizing Consultant with Crescendo

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Koshu Kunii on Unsplash

***DISCLAIMER: Muslims across the globe span a multitude of nationalities and diverse ethnicities. As such, Muslim American communities are not a monolith.

While we wrote this article from the perspective of the collective “we,” this is not intended to over generalize the important differences in history, heritage, experiences, and politics that span Muslim American communities. Furthermore, we acknowledge that there are also Black Arab and Black Desi communities living in the Middle East, North Africa, South Asia, and elsewhere in the world. …


The fight for justice must include economic and housing protections and access to quality health care.

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Nechirwan Kavian on Unsplash

by Tracey Corder, Campaign Coordinator at ACRE

The executions of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Tony McDade and countless other people whose names we do not know have forced the United States into much needed upheaval. For weeks now, people have taken to the streets to demand accountability for the police officers who rain violence on the people they are supposed to protect and serve.

At the core of this national movement for Black dignity and safety is a deep understanding that the police have never existed to protect our lives. The very function of police is to protect capital and value property over people. It is not an exaggeration to say that police contact can be a death sentence for Black people. …


Police Brutality Bonds: A new look at the groundbreaking report

Image for post
Image for post

We write this letter in the midst of over 20 days and counting of mass protests in all 50 states and around the globe following the murder of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis Police. …


ACRE publishes the open letter in response to 8 Can’t Wait and other Democratic led police reform proposals, in collaboration with grassroots organizers and organizations (full signers list included) across the United States working for racial justice. At this critical moment in the Movement for Black Lives as well as the broad work of advancing justice, human rights and a multiracial democracy in the U.S., political clarity and developing rigorous movement strategy are key to our success.

Image for post
Image for post
Photo by Mike Von on Unsplash

Dear Movement —

It is not possible to reform the police.

We are in a moment of crisis and met with the opportunity for transformation. The brutal police murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Tony McDade, and so many other Black lives have sparked an uprising against racist police violence. At the heart of these uprisings have been calls to arrest, prosecute, defund, and abolish the police. As organizers and organizations with large platforms, and bases of individuals and their families locally and nationally, we have a responsibility to put forth and support the most transformative solutions we can imagine.

It is with this conviction that we raise our concerns with the proposed protocols proposed by Campaign Zero in “8 Can’t Wait, a set of eight protocols recommended to reduce police violence by 72%. As members of a growing movement that aims to radically rethink the very idea of policing, we believe it is critical for our movement to engage in comradely debates on the best ways to do this. It should not be considered radical or out of reach to have a world where we can live freely without being killed by the state. …

About

ACRE: Action Center on Race and the Economy

The Action Center on Race & the Economy (ACRE) is a campaign hub for organizations working at the intersection of racial justice and Wall Street accountability.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store